Wednesday, 7 April 2010

Medinet Habu Part 3

Back with part 3 of the Medinet Habu shots.

From Medinet Habu, Egypt


More surviving paint. When dreaming up pseudo-Egyptian dungeon locales we tend to think of them as being mono-coloured and the same colour as the surrounding arid wastes but really the original structures must have been shockingly gaudy when new.

From Medinet Habu, Egypt


This is not actually a collection of pots and urns out in a courtyard. This is the remnants of what is known as a hypostyle hall. This is noteworthy for dungeon design. Essentially with contemporary building technology a large open space couldn't be roofed without making use of many closely-spaced pillars. In some cases the pillars would be taller than the walls, allowing for shorter "spacers" to be placed atop the walls to support the roof at it's edges - thus creating windows high up with which to admit light. If you are creating large open spaces in a dungeon with a flat ceiling, you will (barring use of magic or similar hand-waving to keep the roof in situ) need to make it a hypostyle. Here endeth the lesson.

In this case, this is all that remains of a hypostyle right at the western extreme of Medinet Habu. I'm not sure what happened to the rest of it, perhaps looted for building materials.

From Medinet Habu, Egypt


More of the hypostyle.

From Medinet Habu, Egypt


This is what I saw when I came to after failing a SAN test when sighting the chtonian horror. It begs to have a 1920s explorer in the shot.

From Medinet Habu, Egypt


From Medinet Habu, Egypt


A lot of Egyptian statues have been defaced, mainly by the iconoclasm of Islam which has something of a downer on the depiction of the face. Other statues and carvings I saw showed a lot of degradation that didn't appear to be sufficient to suggest that human hands had deliberately effaced them, but was marked enough so that the difference between them and the surrounding stone was notable.

This is a guess but I suspect that the final finishing of carvings, bas-reliefs and statues might have been undertaken with lime or similar caustic and abrasive substances and this has weakened the stone such that it has aged worse than the areas of identical stone that wasn't finished in the same fashion. Perhaps your Living Statues could be heavily pock-marked or defaced by later iconoclasts who wanted to deny the original gods.

From Medinet Habu, Egypt


From Medinet Habu, Egypt


From Medinet Habu, Egypt

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